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AirTalk remembers the life and presidential legacy of President George H.W. Bush




HOUSTON, TEXAS - DECEMBER 03:  Joint services military honor guard carry the flag-draped casket of the remains of President George H.W. Bush during a departure ceremony to Washington D. C at Ellington Field on December 3, 2018 in Houston, Texas.
HOUSTON, TEXAS - DECEMBER 03: Joint services military honor guard carry the flag-draped casket of the remains of President George H.W. Bush during a departure ceremony to Washington D. C at Ellington Field on December 3, 2018 in Houston, Texas.
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George H.W. Bush played many prominent public roles in nearly a century of life, from when he was a 20-year-old World War II hero to the 41st president of the United States.

In between came turns as a congressman, director of the CIA, an ambassador to the United Nations and China, and a two-term vice president.

Yet colleagues and friends described the great-grandfather as humble, modest and unfailingly polite.

Bush, who died late Friday at his Houston home at age 94, would see his popularity as president soar after he assembled a U.S.-led military coalition that liberated the oil-rich nation of Kuwait from its invading neighbor Iraq in 1991 during the Gulf War. But just a year later, a deepening economic crisis at home would drive him from office when he lost his bid for re-election.

Still, the Republican would reinvent himself yet again by becoming an elder statesman admired by members of both major political parties. Bush, who died just eight months after the death of his wife of seven decades, Barbara, also saw his son George W. Bush twice elected as the nation's 43rd president.

AirTalk remembers Bush.

Guests:

Tony Coelho, former U.S. Congressman, who worked closely with President George H.W. Bush to pass the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990; founder of The Coelho Center for Disability Law, Policy & Innovation at Loyola Law School

Mark Updegrove, president and CEO of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation, a non-profit organization providing support to the LBJ Presidential Library, and author of the book “The Last Republicans: Inside the Extraordinary Relationship Between George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush” (HarperLuxe, November 2017); he tweets @MarkKUpdegrove