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Paris might have championed the climate agreement, but the ‘yellow vest’ unrest is growing




French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe says the government is suspending a planned fuel tax hike, after
French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe says the government is suspending a planned fuel tax hike, after "yellow vest" demonstrators took to the streets for months of protests.
Claude Paris/AP

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The French government had planned on hiking fuel prices in an attempt to wean consumers off of fossil fuels, but that plan came to a halt on Tuesday — at least temporarily.

The six-month delay comes on the heels of some of worst riots the country has seen in decades. But the the delay is being viewed by many protesters as “too little, too late.” Protests began November 17th with motorists upset over the fuel tax increase, but have grown to encompass a range of complaints: the stagnant economy, social injustice and France’s tax system, one of the highest in Europe. Some are now calling for French President Emmanuel Macron to resign.

Last weekend, more than 130 people were injured and 412 arrested during riots at the French capital. Shops were looted and cars torched in plush neighborhoods around the famed Champs-Elysees Avenue. The Arc de Triomphe was sprayed with graffiti and vandalized. We check in for the latest.

With files from the Associated Press. 

Guest: 

Michael J. Geary, modern Europe and European Union analyst at the Wilson Center, a Washington-based non-partisan policy forum that tackles global issues through independent research