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After some Jewish millennials walk off Birthright, we look at how different generations regard the program




Jewish worshippers perform prayers during the holiday of Sukkot (the Feast of the Tabernacles) at the Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem on September 26, 2018.
Jewish worshippers perform prayers during the holiday of Sukkot (the Feast of the Tabernacles) at the Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem on September 26, 2018.
AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP/Getty Images

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This summer, some L.A. locals with Jewish American activist group IfNotNow walked off their Birthright buses to protest the program's perceived silence on Israel's occupation of Palestinian lands — and to hear directly from Palestinians.

The Birthright protests and rise of IfNotNow highlight a generational shift in the American Jewish community, with social justice-driven millennials criticizing Israel's policies in ways their parents and grandparents mostly haven't.

Trying to "disrupt the dialogue," these young organizers are calling out the Jewish institutions that raised them — Jewish day schools, summer camps, youth groups and Birthright Israel.

Today on AirTalk, we look at how different generations of Jewish Americans view the Birthright Israel program.

Read the rest of Aaron’s story here.

Guests:

Aaron Schrank, reporter covering religion and diaspora for KPCC, where he has followed this story; he tweets @aaronschrank

Danielle Raskin, one of the Birthright participants who walked off the trip in June; she is a member of the Jewish American activist group IfNotNow; she tweets @DanielleRaskin1

David Lehrer, president of Community Advocates, Inc., a nonprofit in Los Angeles; former Los Angeles regional director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) for 27 years; he tweets @dlehrer