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Double jeopardy: SCOTUS hears arguments in case that could affect 2016 Russia meddling investigation




The administration is asking a lower court to block Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross' deposition as it prepares to ask the Supreme Court to review the lawsuits over the 2020 census citizenship question.
The administration is asking a lower court to block Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross' deposition as it prepares to ask the Supreme Court to review the lawsuits over the 2020 census citizenship question.
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The Supreme Court seems likely to preserve a constitutional rule that allows state and federal governments to prosecute someone for the same crime.

Several justices are saying in arguments this morning that they are reluctant to upset the long-standing rule that provides an exception to the Constitution's ban on trying someone twice for the same offense. The court is considering the case of federal prison inmate Terance Gamble. He was prosecuted by Alabama and the federal government for having a gun after an earlier conviction for robbery. A ruling for Gamble could have a spillover effect on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. But that issue did not come up at all in Thursday’s arguments. Larry Mantle checks in on the latest on the case.

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Richard Wolf, Supreme Court correspondent for USA Today who was at the hearings this morning

Brianne Gorad, chief counsel at the Constitutional Accountability Center, a law firm and think tank regarding constitutional issues

Lisa Soronen, Executive Director, State and Local Legal Center in Washington DC