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What lies ahead after British PM Theresa May announces ‘Brexit’ deal will be held up




A sculpture of the Queen’s head by Italian artist Matt Marga is graffitied with the word BREXIT at Hyde Park on December 10, 2018 in London, England.
A sculpture of the Queen’s head by Italian artist Matt Marga is graffitied with the word BREXIT at Hyde Park on December 10, 2018 in London, England.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

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British Prime Minister Theresa May on Monday postponed Parliament's vote on her Brexit divorce deal with the European Union, acknowledging that lawmakers would have rejected it by a "significant margin."

The move averted a humiliating defeat for the government in a vote that had been scheduled for Tuesday. But it throws Britain's Brexit plans into disarray, with the country's departure from the EU just over three months away on March 29.

In an emergency statement to the House of Commons, May accepted that lawmakers had "widespread and deep concern" about some aspects of the divorce deal agreed upon last month between May and EU leaders.

"As a result, if we went ahead and held the vote tomorrow, the deal would be rejected by a significant margin," she said. "We will therefore defer the vote."

May said she would seek "assurances" from the EU and bring the Brexit deal back to Parliament, but did not set a new date for the vote.

Many lawmakers were scathing in their comments about both May's actions and the Brexit deal, and derisive laughter erupted when May claimed there was "broad support" for many aspects of the plan.

With files from the Associated Press

Guest:

Gary O’Donoghue, Washington correspondent for the BBC and former chief political correspondent in London for the BBC; he tweets @BBCBlindGazza