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As Trump admin plans rollback on country’s clean water rules, a look at the California impact




Wetlands restored around Babcock Ranch in Punta Gorda, Florida, April 22, 2016 as part of a plan to build the United States first eco-friendly town from the ground up.
Wetlands restored around Babcock Ranch in Punta Gorda, Florida, April 22, 2016 as part of a plan to build the United States first eco-friendly town from the ground up.
KERRY SHERIDAN/AFP/Getty Images

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On Tuesday, the Trump administration rolled back Clean Water Act federal protections for acres of wetlands and waterways, including nearly two-thirds of inland streams in California.

One of the more controversial parts of the proposal is the stripping of protections from seasonal waterways. The proposal would alter the Environmental Protection Agency’s definition of U.S. “waters,” shrinking it to major waterways, as well as a few other categories. This is a change from the Obama-era definition, which had broadened protections to smaller streams, garnering backlash from developers and farming groups who saw it as overreach.

The new proposal will have implications for agriculture, drinking water quality, development and the environment. We gather stakeholders to discuss what the new plan would mean for California.

Guests:

Kari Fisher, senior counsel for the California Farm Bureau Federation; she specializes in the Clean Water Act and other water quality issues

Jon Devine, director of federal water policy for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)  

Peter Tateishi, CEO of the Associated General Contractors of California