Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Breaking down today’s no-confidence vote on Theresa May in British Parliament, and what it all means for Brexit




Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in central London on December 12, 2018 ahead of the weekly question and answer session, Prime Ministers Questions (PMQs), in the House of Commons.
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in central London on December 12, 2018 ahead of the weekly question and answer session, Prime Ministers Questions (PMQs), in the House of Commons.
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

10:51
Download this story 5.0MB

British Conservative lawmakers forced a no-confidence vote in Prime Minister Theresa May today, throwing U.K. politics deeper into crisis and Brexit further into doubt.

May vowed to fight for the leadership of her party and the country "with everything I've got" after opponents who have been circling for weeks finally got the numbers they needed to spark a vote among Conservative Party lawmakers later in the day.

The leadership challenge marks a violent eruption of the Conservative Party's decades-long divide over Europe.

The threat to May has been building as pro-Brexit lawmakers within the Conservative Party grew increasingly frustrated with the prime minister's conduct of Brexit and the divorce deal she has agreed with the European Union.

The challenge throws Britain's already rocky path out of the EU, which it is due to leave in March, into further chaos. It comes days after May postponed a vote to approve the divorce deal to avoid all-but-certain defeat.

The BBC’s Gary O’DOnoghue joins AirTalk to talk about the political future of Teresa May.

With files from the Associated Press. 

Guest:

Gary O’Donoghue, Washington correspondent for the BBC and former chief political correspondent in London for the BBC; he tweets @BBCBlindGazza