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Federal school safety panel created post-Parkland recommends better mental health services, more teacher training, downplays gun control in final report




U.S. President Donald Trump leads a roundtable discussion on school safety and the new Federal Commission on School Safety report with family members of shooting victims, along with state and local officials, in the Roosevelt Room at the White House on December 18, 2018 in Washington, DC.
U.S. President Donald Trump leads a roundtable discussion on school safety and the new Federal Commission on School Safety report with family members of shooting victims, along with state and local officials, in the Roosevelt Room at the White House on December 18, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

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A commission created by President Trump in the wake of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida has released its final report detailing suggestions for policy changes and best practices for improving school safety across the country.

Among the panel’s recommendations, in addition to increasing the capacity of schools to address students’ mental health issues and better training for school personnel, the report also recommends that the Obama-era guidelines on school discipline that were designed to decrease instances of racial discrimination in disciplining students.

Do you agree with the commission’s recommendations on best practices and policy changes aimed at improving school security? What about potential unforeseen consequences? How would these recommendations, if implemented, change the way schools handle student discipline? Do you think they would improve school security or put students, faculty and staff at more risk?

We reached out to the Federal School Safety Commission and the U.S. Department of Education to request someone be made available to discuss the final report, but we did not receive a response to our request.

Guests:

Max Eden, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, where his work includes researching federal education policy and school discipline; he tweets @maxeden99

Kristen Harper, director for policy development at Child Trends, a nonprofit research organization based in Bethesda, Maryland; she was a senior policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Education from 2009-2016; she tweets @KHarper_edulove