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Credit card companies play a role in financing mass shootings. Should they be tracking suspicious purchases?




National Rifle Association and credit card stickers are stuck on the front door of the Illinois Gun Works store September 10, 2004 in Elmwood Park, Illinois.
National Rifle Association and credit card stickers are stuck on the front door of the Illinois Gun Works store September 10, 2004 in Elmwood Park, Illinois.
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

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Back in April, the Wall Street Journal published a story about how the Parkland shooting sparked credit card companies and banks to talk about potentially tracking gun purchases.

This week, The New York Times released a report that outlines the actual financial role of credit cards in the purchases of guns used in mass shootings. It found that, in a number of cases, from the Pulse Nightclub to the recent shooting in Las Vegas, the perpetrator had charged thousands of dollars on their credit cards on guns and ammunition.

Though the article suggests that credit companies could -- and should -- monitor purchases of guns and weaponry, the feasibility of this is up for debate. Guest host Queena Kim discusses with a panel of guests.

With guest host Queena Kim.

Guests:

Telis Demos, reporter at WSJ who’s been following the story; he tweets @telisdemos

Kevin Sullivan, president of the Anti-Money Laundering Training Academy, a consulting firm that trains financial institutions to identify suspicious spending activity; he was in law enforcement for 22 years, and served on a governmental agency where he tracked financial crime and money laundering

Josh Blackman, associate professor of law at South Texas College of Law Houston, where his expertise includes the intersection of law and technology; he tweets @JoshMBlackman

James Wester, research director at International Data Corporation, a market research firm