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‘Latinx’: A generational debate?




Students march in streets carrying latin american flags to protest against a proposed immigration policy March 28, 2006 in Los Angeles, California
Students march in streets carrying latin american flags to protest against a proposed immigration policy March 28, 2006 in Los Angeles, California
J. Emilio Flores/Getty Images

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Earlier this year, “Latinx” was officially added to Merriam-Webster’s dictionary.

The term replaces the traditional Latino/a title and is meant to be an inclusive alternative that integrates those who do not identify within the gender binary. The “x” breaks the inherently male/female binary in the Spanish language and in doing so, incorporates trans, queer, or nonbinary people.

The gender-neutral term, however, has received some criticism. Some say the term doesn’t translate to Spanish while others argue that its elitist. The term has also unveiled a generational divide— younger American Latinos, who generally have more access to higher education than their older counterparts, are more apt to embrace the term.

Guest host Queena Kim discusses the word, its evolution and reaction amongst different age groups. We also examine similar instances in other diasporic communities. If you’re of Latin American descent, what’re your thoughts on the word Latinx? If you’re from a different community, have you seen similar examples? Call us and weigh in at  (866) 893-5722.

With guest host Queena Kim.

Guests:

Amelia Tseng, assistant professor of world languages and cultures at American University; she tweets @AmeliaTseng

Concepción de León, New York Times staff writer for the Books desk and El Espace, a weekly column where she writes about news and culture for a Latinx audience; she tweets @bycdl