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Tips and tricks for curbing that New Year’s hangover you’ve been nursing all week




This picture taken on February 4, 2017 shows dried pollack hangover soup at a restaurant in Hoenggye town, near the venue for the opening and closing ceremonies for the upcoming PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games in Pyeongchang.
This picture taken on February 4, 2017 shows dried pollack hangover soup at a restaurant in Hoenggye town, near the venue for the opening and closing ceremonies for the upcoming PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games in Pyeongchang.
JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

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If you’ve ever woken up after a night of revelry and heavy drinking with a throbbing head, churning stomach, and a general distaste for being awake, you’ve probably also wished that there was some kind of hangover cure.

But as you try to peel your face from your sheets, silently wondering whether anyone got the license plate number of the bus you think might’ve hit you the night before, you realize that aside from traveling back in time and choosing not to drink as much, there isn’t anything out there that makes a hangover disappear.

That said, everyone has an answer when you ask what their preferred remedy is for taking the edge off. Some swear by food – cheeseburgers, bacon and eggs, pozole, or a breakfast burrito from Lucky Boy in Pasadena. Korean cuisine even has its own soup named just for such an occasion called ‘haejang guk’ which means ‘soup to chase a hangover.’ Others prefer mass rehydration – drink tons of water or Gatorade or Pedialyte and rest. Here in California, where it’s legal to consume recreational marijuana, some users swear by weed as the ultimate hangover killer, as cannabis has been known to be used to treat headaches and nausea. And yet still others turn to the “hair of the dog” method and simply start drinking again.

What’s your hangover remedy of choice? How did you discover that it worked? Does your family or culture have any special homemade remedies? Share your favorites by calling 866-893-5722.

With guest host Kyle Stokes.

Guests:

Elina Shatkin, food editor at KPCC and the LAist; she tweets @elinashatkin

Quincy Surasmith, digital assistant producer for the KPCC In Person team



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