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Against a backdrop of infighting, the Women’s March enters its third year. What does the movement mean to you?




Actors Rowan Blanchard, Alfre Woodard and Jurnee Smollett-Bell onstage during the Women's March Los Angeles 2018 on January 20, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.
Actors Rowan Blanchard, Alfre Woodard and Jurnee Smollett-Bell onstage during the Women's March Los Angeles 2018 on January 20, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.
Chelsea Guglielmino/Getty Images

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This Saturday, January 19, marks the third Women’s March both nationally and in Los Angeles.

It’s been a tough year for the March, which has faced infighting over questions about inclusivity, anti-semitism and even its name.

For example, the organizers of a march in Eureka, California cancelled the event over fears that it was not racially diverse enough, and in turn a third party has decided to organize a march.

Meanwhile, there have been calls for some of the national leaders of the March to step down over allegations of anti-Semitism and their association with Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. It appears that the Democratic National Committee has pulled out from being a partner of the March. New York will be hosting two different marches nearly 50 blocks apart.

Last year’s Los Angeles march drew nearly 600,000 people. We’ll have to wait until Saturday to see this year’s turnout -- but on Facebook, 8.9K people are registered as “going.”

Are you going to the March this year, and if so, why? What does the March mean to you? How has this year’s infighting affected your perception of the movement? And if you’re not going this year, why not?

Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Samantha Schmidt, reporter for The Washington Post where she covers gender and family issues; she tweets @schmidtsam7

Emiliana Guereca, executive director of Women’s March LA



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