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As Democrats launch presidential bids, what does it take to make a campaign machine?




Donna Elms wears a Democrat donkey pin while lining up outside in advance of a campaign rally with former President Barack Obama, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, and Senator Bob Casey (D- PA) on September 21, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Donna Elms wears a Democrat donkey pin while lining up outside in advance of a campaign rally with former President Barack Obama, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, and Senator Bob Casey (D- PA) on September 21, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Mark Makela/Getty Images

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Donations. Likes. Policy chops. These are typically on the list when candidates want to launch a presidential campaign. But since the 2016 presidential election, the rules are evolving.

As reported by the Washington Post earlier this week, former Democratic Congressman Beto O’Rourke was either playing his cards close to the vest, or didn’t have a plan when asked to address visa overstays. The former is less likely. That’s raised questions about how much experience and policy knowledge a Dem candidate must have in order to succeed. And then there’s the controversy around campaign donations. The Los Angeles Times reported that Democratic presidential hopefuls like senators Kamala Harris and Corey Booker will have big money behind them.

But with the momentum of Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primary, who made small donations the name of the game, liberal activists may not take kindly to the more conventional large contributors that presidential campaigns have historically run on. Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren has also vowed to reject small donations. But a persistent question is how much the playing field has changed since President Donald Trump was elected. And with so many Democratic candidates, what will frontrunners need to stay ahead of the game? Larry speaks to a panel of Democratic strategists to find out more.

Guests:

Matt Rodriguez, Democratic strategist and founder and chief executive officer of Rodriguez Strategies. He is also a former senior Obama advisor in 2008; he tweets @RodStrategies

Jamal Simmons, Democratic strategist and host for Hill.TV, The Hill’s video division; He has worked for the Bill Clinton (1992), Al Gore (2000) and Barack Obama (2008) presidential campaigns.

Marsha Catron, Democratic strategist and partner at Swann Street Strategies in Washington D.C.; She has worked for the Obama and Bill Richardson 2008 presidential campaigns



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