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What US announcement of withdrawal from Cold War treaty with Russia means for already tense relations between the countries




U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo holds a news briefing at the State Department February 01, 2019 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo holds a news briefing at the State Department February 01, 2019 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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The Trump administration said that the United States will pull out of a nuclear treaty with Russia on Saturday if Russia continues not to comply.

It’s called the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Force treaty, and it’s kept the arms race between Russia and the U.S. under control since the Cold War ended. The U.S. claims Russia has violated the treaty for several years now, but Russia denies the violation.

Analysts worry leaving the treaty will lead to an arms race. Officials say the treaty is prohibiting the U.S. from responding to China as it continues to deploy missiles in Asia. But it won’t happen all at once. Full withdrawal from the treaty will take six months.

Should the United States withdrawal from the treaty? How will that affect its relationships with Russia and China?

Guest:

David Sanger, national security correspondent for the New York Times; he is the author of  "The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage and Fear in the Cyber Age” (Crown, June 2018); he tweets @SangerNYT