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What is a fair standard racially and ethnically for gang injunction traffic stops?




California Highway patrol officers stop a car at a road block a day after a standoff between law enforcement officers and who is believed to be suspected murderer and former Los Angeles Police Department officer Christopher Dorner on February 13, 2013 in Angelus Oaks, California.
California Highway patrol officers stop a car at a road block a day after a standoff between law enforcement officers and who is believed to be suspected murderer and former Los Angeles Police Department officer Christopher Dorner on February 13, 2013 in Angelus Oaks, California.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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LA Mayor Eric Garcetti’s calling for the LAPD’s Metropolitan Division to stop pulling over as many cars as they’ve been doing in recent years.

Just over three years ago the Mayor announced the elite division would double in size to fight increasing crime. That’s led to a dramatic increase in the number of vehicle stops in the city.

The LA Times reported recently African-American drivers were five times more likely to be pulled over, relative to the overall population, than drivers of other races and ethnicities.

But given the proactive approach to policing is designed to crack down on the subset of gang offenders, is the overall population comparison relevant?

We reached out to the Los Angeles Police Department to request comment, but as of the airing of this segment we have not received a response. We will update this story if we hear back from them.

Guests:

Peter Moskos, professor of law and police science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City; he tweets @PeterMoskos

Alberto Retana, CEO and president at Community Coalition, a community outreach group based in South Los Angeles; he tweets @aretana