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There’s bipartisan budget proposal that would keep the government open until September, but would President Trump sign it?




U.S. President Donald Trump attends a rally at the  El Paso County Coliseum on February 11, 2019 in El Paso, Texas
U.S. President Donald Trump attends a rally at the El Paso County Coliseum on February 11, 2019 in El Paso, Texas
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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A tentative agreement to fund the federal government through the fiscal year averts a shutdown but gives President Donald Trump far less money than he sought for building a border wall with Mexico. 

The deal hammered out Monday night provides nearly $1.4 billion, not the $5.7 billion the president had demanded and was at the center of the dispute that sparked last month's record shutdown. The agreement calls for 55 miles of metal slats or other types of new fencing, not a concrete wall. The fencing would be built in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.

The pact includes money for other border security measures, including advanced screening at border entry points and customs officers. The White House says it needs more time to assess a bipartisan border security deal.  

Spokesman Hogan Gidley says it's difficult to say what will and won't be acceptable before officials have a chance to review details of the proposal House and Senate lawmakers agreed to Monday night. 

President Donald Trump has demanded $5.7 billion to build a U.S.-Mexico border wall but Congress has refused to provide the money. Negotiators instead have tentatively agreed to $1.4 billion for border barriers - well below the amount Trump has sought.

With files from the Associated Press

Guest:

Anna Edgerton, Congressional reporter for Bloomberg News