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SCOTUS check: Supreme Court’s latest decision, its whopping April caseload and more




United States Supreme Court (Front L-R) Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Jr., (Back L-R) Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Elena Kagan and Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh pose for their official portrait at the in the East Conference Room at the Supreme Court building November 30, 2018 in Washington, DC.
United States Supreme Court (Front L-R) Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Jr., (Back L-R) Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Elena Kagan and Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh pose for their official portrait at the in the East Conference Room at the Supreme Court building November 30, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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The United States Supreme Court announced a unanimous decision to limit local government seizure of property in criminal cases.

Yesterday, the court release an exceptionally long roster of 12 cases scheduled for the month of April. The most high profile case is over the Census including a citizenship question, an addition that opponents say will diminish the accuracy of the count. Census forms are scheduled to be finalized in June adding pressure to expedite the case.

Other notable cases include whether law enforcement can draw blood from an unconscious person to check their blood alcohol level; and if vulgar trademarks are protected under the first amendment. Also on the slate, is visible carrying a firearm tantamount to “an act of violence” or is the definition constitutionally vague?

Also today, the court agreed to hear a case in October that will determine how far the Clean Water Act can reach into local pollution. We review the scheduled cases and their potential impacts and possible outcomes under the current court of justices.

Guests:  

Amy Howe, cofounder of SCOTUSBlog and and author of the blog, "Howe on the Courts"; she tweets @AHoweBlogger

Greg Stohr, covering the Supreme Court for Bloomberg News; tweets @GregStohr



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