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‘Leaving Neverland’ and the troubled legacy of Michael Jackson




An aerial photo shows a Santa Barbara County Sheriff's vehicle in front of singer Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch November 18, 2003 outside of Santa Barbara, California.
An aerial photo shows a Santa Barbara County Sheriff's vehicle in front of singer Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch November 18, 2003 outside of Santa Barbara, California.
Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

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The new HBO two-part documentary series “Leaving Neverland” is forcing a re-examination of the child molestation allegations against Michael Jackson.

Airing March 3 and 4, the documentary centers on Wade Robson and James Safechuck who allege that Michael Jackson began sexual relationships with the boys when they were ages 7 and 10, respectively.  

The documentary shows a pop star who used his fame to groom boys and manipulate their families. While allegations of child sex abuse against Jackson were dismissed in a court of law, the documentary is a catalyst for many to re-evaluate their relationship to the King of Pop, his music and his persona.

Jackson was criminally tried and acquitted of child molestation and related charges in 2005.

If you watched “Leaving Neverland,” has it changed your mind about Michael Jackson? If you’re a fan of his music, will this make you perceive his music differently? How has this documentary resonated among fans, both those disappointed and defiant?

With guest host Libby Denkmann.

Guests:

Eric Deggans, TV critic for NPR; he tweets @Deggans

Hank Stuever, TV critic for the Washington Post, where he covered the 2005 Michael Jackson trial and reviewed “Leaving Neverland”; he tweets @hankstuever

Tirhakah Love, journalist and TV columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle who wrote about watching the documentary for the paper; he tweets @tirhakahlove



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