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California Supreme Court declines review of public access to police records law




Police stand at a roadblock near Salvadore Castro Middle School in Los Angeles, California on February 1, 2018,
Police stand at a roadblock near Salvadore Castro Middle School in Los Angeles, California on February 1, 2018,
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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The California Supreme Court yesterday denied to review a police transparency law that allows internal police records to be released to the public.

On January 1st of this year, California passed SB 1421, a law allowing the public to request access to police records including disciplinary reports and records on police shootings. But debate about whether the law can be applied retroactively has been brought up by police unions across the state.

Yesterday’s decision comes after the Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs filed a petition arguing that the law violates privacy rights. The court decided not to take action on the request.

We check in on the latest.

With guest host Libby Denkmann

Guests:

Annie Gilbertson, investigative reporter at KPCC; host of the KPCC podcast, Repeat

Lolita Harper, director of government and media relations for the Sheriff’s Employees Benefits Association, the union that represents the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department; she is a retired detective with San Bernardino County



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