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How should universities deal with the students implicated in the admissions cheating scandal?




In the wake of the college admissions scandal that has ensnared a slew of wealthy parents, college coaches and others in the world of academia, USC has placed a hold on the accounts of students allegedly connected to the scheme.
In the wake of the college admissions scandal that has ensnared a slew of wealthy parents, college coaches and others in the world of academia, USC has placed a hold on the accounts of students allegedly connected to the scheme.
Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images

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In the wake of a massive college bribery scheme, the schools caught in the middle have been left facing a thorny question: What to do about the students who may have been admitted through fraud?

The University of Southern California announced late Monday it had placed holds on an undisclosed number of students, meaning they can’t register for classes or obtain transcripts until their cases are reviewed. After a review, USC officials said they would take appropriate action, “up to revoking admission or expulsion.”

At Yale, the president declined to comment on specific cases but said it’s a “longstanding policy is to rescind the admission of students who falsified their Yale College applications.” Stanford similarly noted that students could be “disenrolled” or have offers of admission rescinded.

More than 30 parents have been charged in the scheme in which prosecutors say a disgraced college admissions consultant, William “Rick” Singer , took millions of dollars in bribes to assure their children’s entry into top colleges by getting them recruited for sports they didn’t play and by arranging for standardized tests to be rigged.

How do you think colleges should deals with students implicated in the scandal? Does it matter whether they knew whether their parents were rigging their applications? What about seniors or alumni that have proved their academic rigor?

Call us at 866-893-5722.

With files from the Associated Press

Guest:

Anemona Hartocollis, national correspondent covering higher education for The New York Times; she tweets @anemonanyc