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Study finds women’s brains appear to be younger than men’s




A picture of a human brain taken by a positron emission tomography scanner, also called PET scan, is seen on a screen on January 9, 2019, at the Regional and University Hospital Center of Brest in western France.
A picture of a human brain taken by a positron emission tomography scanner, also called PET scan, is seen on a screen on January 9, 2019, at the Regional and University Hospital Center of Brest in western France.
FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images

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The findings of a new study from Washington University School of Medicine suggest women's brains appear three years younger than men's.

The study looked at 200 people from 20 to 80 years old and how their brain’s use sugar.

Women’s brains on average are three years younger than men’s.

Today on AirTalk, we’ll explore how researchers came to that conclusion and what we can learn from their research.

Have any questions? Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Marcus E. Raichle MD, co-author of the study recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; neurologist and professor of radiology and neurology at Washington University in St Louis.

Gayatri Devi MD, clinical professor of neurology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and attending neurologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City; director of Park Avenue Neurology, a private office in New York.