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When Does A Corporation Become A Monopoly? Facebook Tests Age-Old Antitrust Laws




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Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes thinks it’s time to break up Facebook.

In a piece published last week by the New York Times, Hughes said the government has let Facebook grow too large. He cited a 2018 Pew Center survey that found about two-thirds of U.S. adults use Facebook – and said many don’t realize that the company now owns two other major social media platforms as well: Instagram and WhatsApp.

Meanwhile, the Supreme Court ruled that a monopoly lawsuit over Apple’s App Store can proceed. The lawsuit states that the tech giant is violating antitrust laws by requiring developers to sell their apps through the app store (and taking a 30 percent cut of each purchase). Apple says it’s just facilitating the sales for app developers, who set their own prices.

Larry sits down with experts in antitrust law and policy to look at the arguments for and against breaking up each company.

Guests:

Einer Elhauge, professor of law at Harvard Law School; former Chairman of the Antitrust Advisory Committee to the Obama campaign

Iain Murray, vice president for strategy and senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, a non-profit public policy organization dedicated to free market principles.