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State Bill Wants To Let Student Athletes Sign Endorsement Deals, But It Could Run Afoul Of The NCAA




Shabazz Napier of the Connecticut Huskies speaks to the media in the locker room after defeating Kentucky in the NCAA Men's Final Four Championship on April 7.
Shabazz Napier of the Connecticut Huskies speaks to the media in the locker room after defeating Kentucky in the NCAA Men's Final Four Championship on April 7.
Jamie Squire/Getty Images

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Because of regulations set out by the National Collegiate Athletic Assn (NCAA), college athletes can’t sign endorsement deals or get agents -- however, a California bill currently moving through the legislature might change that. 

Senate Bill 206 would allow college athletes to make money off their “name, image, or likeness.” Proponents argue that coaches and colleges already make a hefty profit off student athletes and that it’s unfair for these athletes, who dedicate so much of their time to sport, to be unable to profit off their talents. 

But critics, including Stanford University and the University of California, have expressed concerns that the bill might restrict California teams from participating in NCAA championship tournaments. 

We discuss the pros and cons of the bill. Plus, if you were or are currently a student athlete, what do you think of the proposal?  

We reached out to the NCAA. They did not respond to our request for an interview

Guests:

Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley), principal author of SB-206; state senator representing California’s 9th Senate District, which includes the cities of Oakland, Richmond and Berkeley

Alex Graves, vice president for government relations for the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU), membership organization of 84 non-profit colleges and universities in California