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Considering Impacts On The Muslim Community, Are CVE Programs Really The Best Way To Fight Domestic Terrorism?




People pray and pay their respects at the makeshift memorial for victims of the shooting that left a total of 22 people dead at the Cielo Vista Mall WalMart (background) in El Paso, Texas, on August 6, 2019.
People pray and pay their respects at the makeshift memorial for victims of the shooting that left a total of 22 people dead at the Cielo Vista Mall WalMart (background) in El Paso, Texas, on August 6, 2019.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

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In the aftermath of two mass shootings this past weekend, one in Texas and another in Ohio, national security experts have called for ramping up resources against domestic terrorism.

The U.S. has spent a couple decades employing resources against Islamic terrorists, following the terrorist attacks on 9/11. But some of those efforts had severe consequences for a specific group of people: Muslims. As experts call for aggressive action against homegrown terrorism, we discuss the implications of Countering Violent Terrorism (CVE) programs.

The city of Los Angeles came under fire last year when it considered accepting a federal grant aimed at countering terrorism through the CVE program. We also look at what factors determine the launch of a domestic terrorism investigation, which federal authorities have now done in regards to the shooting at a garlic festival in Gilroy a couple weeks ago.

With guest host Libby Denkmann

Guests:

Mary McCord, visiting professor of law at Georgetown University; she was the acting Assistant Attorney General for National Security at the U.S. Department of Justice from 2016-2017 and served as its Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the National Security Division from 2014-2016

Salam Al-Marayati, president of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, a national nonprofit that focuses on American Muslims issues; he tweets @SalamAlmarayati

Laboni Hoq, litigation director with Asian Americans Advancing Justice in Los Angeles; she leads the organization's civil rights impact litigation