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A Closer Look At The New York Times’ 1619 Project




Engraving shows the arrival of a Dutch slave ship with a group of African slaves for sale, Jamestown, Virginia, 1619.
Engraving shows the arrival of a Dutch slave ship with a group of African slaves for sale, Jamestown, Virginia, 1619.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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Four hundred years ago today, on August 20th, 1619, the first enslaved people from Africa arrived on the shores of Virginia. 

In observance of the anniversary, the New York Times Magazine recently launched “The 1619 Project”-- a series examing and detailing the legacy of slavery in America. The project aims to reframe American history and provide a greater understanding of the impact slavery had on the country. The series began when reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones pitched the project as an entire issue dedicated solely to the ways in which slavery has shaped the country. It includes contributions from writers, poets, photographers, and reporters, among others.  

For more on the project, its significance and response, we speak with Nikole Hannah-Jones of the New York Times and Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, a history professor at UC Berkeley.

With guest host Libby Denkmann

Guests:

Nikole Hannah-Jones, reporter for The New York Times Magazine focusing on racial injustice; she led the 1619 Project

Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, associate professor of history at UC Berkeley