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Impeachment Inquiry Slow Burn Continues As Mike Pompeo, William Barr & Australia’s Prime Minister Enter The Discussion




U.S. Attorney General William Barr speaks at the International Conference on Cyber Security at Fordham University School of Law on July 23, 2019 in New York City.
U.S. Attorney General William Barr speaks at the International Conference on Cyber Security at Fordham University School of Law on July 23, 2019 in New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Tuesday declared that House Democrats are trying to "intimidate, bully and treat improperly" five current and former career officials in demanding depositions providing Ukraine matter.

Pompeo said in a letter to the House Foreign Affairs Committee, as part of the chamber's impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, that the requested dates for the officials to voluntarily appear are "not feasible." In issuing a separate subpoena last week as part of the inquiry, the chairmen of three House committees made it clear that stonewalling their investigation would be considered obstruction of Congress in its investigation. It's unclear whether Pompeo will comply with the committee's request for documents by Friday.

Meanwhile, the circle of officials with knowledge of Trump's phone call to Ukraine's president widened with the revelation that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo listened in on the July 25 conversation. Several media outlets are also reporting that officials with knowledge of the call say the president pushed Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrisson to help U.S. Attorney General William Barr review an inquiry into the Mueller probe in the hopes of discrediting it. Democrats on Monday subpoenaed Rudy Giuliani, the president's personal lawyer who was at the heart of Trump's efforts to get Ukraine to investigate political rival Joe Biden's family. That was after one of Trump's staunchest defenders, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, said he would have "no choice" but to consider articles of impeachment if the House approved them.

Today on AirTalk, we’ll recap everything that’s happened over the last 48 hours and put it in some political context for how the impeachment inquiry will proceed.

With files from the Associated Press

With guest host Libby Denkmann.

Guests:

Sadie Gurman, justice department reporter for the Wall Street Journal; she tweets @sgurman

Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News; he tweets @NPRrelving



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