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San Diego Beach City Could Set Precedence In How CA Deals With Rising Sea Levels




A California sea lion yearling walks towards the water on a beach at Point Lobos State Reserve on July 10, 2019 in Carmel, California.
A California sea lion yearling walks towards the water on a beach at Point Lobos State Reserve on July 10, 2019 in Carmel, California.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Countless reports have looked at the impact of climate change and rising sea levels -- and the hit on the communities along the California coast looks dire, to say the very least.

Next week, the California Coastal Commission and Del Mar will meet to discuss the best way for the San Diego beach city to adapt to rising sea levels. The two sides represent two different philosophies on mitigation and adaptation. While the Coastal Commission wants coastal communities to remove structures from bluffs or low-lying land, cities like Del Mar want to reinforce sea walls and replace sand to beaches.

The decision reached between two parties could set a precedence for the rest of the state. 

We reached out to the California Coastal Commission, which is unable to join us today.

Guests:

Erik Anderson, environment reporter at KPBS, the NPR affiliate in San Diego, who’s been covering the story

Jennifer Savage, California Policy Manager at Surfrider Foundation, a nonprofit that focuses on issues facing the world’s ocean and beaches



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