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House Moves Forward With Formal Vote On Impeachment Inquiry, So What’s Next




The U.S. House of Representatives votes on a resolution formalizing the impeachment inquiry centered on U.S. President Donald Trump October 31, 2019 in Washington, DC.
The U.S. House of Representatives votes on a resolution formalizing the impeachment inquiry centered on U.S. President Donald Trump October 31, 2019 in Washington, DC.
Win McNamee/Getty Images

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House Democrats are calling a formal vote on an impeachment inquiry a “natural next step” in the process. It’s unclear what exactly the voting process will look like or how long it will go, but Democrats hope to set the stage for public hearings and how they will work. 

Republicans have been critical of the Democrats’ impeachment resolution process, calling it illegitimate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the resolution would deny the "most basic rights of due process" to Trump such as having his lawyer participate in closed-door depositions by the committee.Democrats say their plan follows how impeachment efforts against Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton were run. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said the vote will take place in order to alleviate any doubts in the process.

The investigation is focused on Trump's efforts to push Ukraine to investigate his Democratic political opponents by withholding military aid and an Oval Office meeting craved by the country's new president. Both parties' leaders have been rounding up votes as Thursday's roll call approaches, with each side eager to come as close to unanimity as possible. If the House impeaches Trump, the Senate would decide whether to remove him from office.

Today on AirTalk, we discuss the latest on the impeachment resolution and take a look back at impeachment proceedings from the past. 

With files from the Associated Press 

Guests:

Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News; he tweets @NPRrelving

John Yoo, professor of law at UC Berkeley; author of many books, including "Crisis and Command: A History of Executive Power from George Washington to George W. Bush" (Kaplan Publishing, 2010)

Craig Shirley, Reagan biographer and presidential historian, his new book, “Mary Ball Washington: The Untold Story of George Washington's Mother,” will be published at the end of the year  (Harper, 2019)