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What We Learned From The First Day Of Impeachment Inquiry Hearings




Chairman Adam Schiff (C), Democrat of California, and Ranking Member Devin Nunes (2nd R), Republican of California, during the first public hearings held by the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence as part of the impeachment inquiry into US President Donald Trump.
Chairman Adam Schiff (C), Democrat of California, and Ranking Member Devin Nunes (2nd R), Republican of California, during the first public hearings held by the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence as part of the impeachment inquiry into US President Donald Trump.
SAUL LOEB/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

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The start of public impeachment hearings took place before Congress. It’s the first time the American public could watch and listen to the witnesses surrounding the impeachment investigation. 

State Department official George Kent and top diplomat to Ukraine William Taylor testified before the House Intelligence Committee. They previously met with House Democrats and provided private testimonies. The hearing operated along party lines. In the several hours of testimony, witnesses were met with questions from Democrats and Republicans concerning Trump’s push for an investigation into the Bidens and the possibility of a quid pro quo. 

Today on AirTalk, we bring together our political panel to break down what happened in today’s impeachment hearings and what we can expect moving forward.

With files from the Associated Press.

Guests:

Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News; he tweets at @NPRrelving

Sean T. Walsh, Republican political analyst and partner at Wilson Walsh Consulting in San Francisco; he is a former adviser to California Governors Pete Wilson and Arnold Schwarzenegger and a former White House staffer for Presidents Reagan and H.W. Bush

William C. Banks, professor emeritus of law at Syracuse University, he’s the co-author of “Constitutional Law: Structure and Rights in Our Federal System,” (Carolina Academic Press, 2018)