Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Recapping The Dem Debate: Experience, Wine Caves, Gifts, Forgiveness And More




(From L) Democratic presidential hopefuls, entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Mayor of South Bend, Indiana Pete Buttigieg, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar and businessman Tom Steyer participate of the sixth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California on December 19, 2019.
(From L) Democratic presidential hopefuls, entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Mayor of South Bend, Indiana Pete Buttigieg, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar and businessman Tom Steyer participate of the sixth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California on December 19, 2019.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

Listen to story

43:24
Download this story 62MB

Wine caves, experience, income inequality, gifts and forgiveness were all topics of conversation at the sixth Democratic debate, which took place at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles Thursday evening. 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren went after South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg for holding a high-dollar fundraiser in a wine cave, something he’s received backlash for. Buttigieg and Sen. Amy Klobuchar clashed over what constitutes enough experience for the office of the president. Former Vice President Joe Biden seemed to be more awake than ever. Andrew Yang addressed being the only person of color on the debate stage, Tom Steyer sparred on foreign policy and Sen. Bernie Sanders didn’t back down from his progressive stances. Answers to the night’s final question broke down differently between genders. When asked whether they’d offer another candidate on the stage a gift or ask for forgiveness, both Warren and Klobuchar asked for forgiveness, while the men offered gifts, many offering their books.It was an interesting night to say the least.

Moving forward, the Democratic National Committee is again upping its polling and fundraising requirements for presidential hopefuls to qualify for the campaign's seventh debate in January. So far, only Buttigieg, Biden, Sanders, Klobuchar and Warren have met the requirements. Ahead of Thursday night's debate, nine candidates wrote to party leaders urging them to consider changing qualifications for subsequent debates, arguing that the thresholds had made the competing field less diverse. 

Today on AirTalk, we recap the biggest moments from Thursday’s debate. We also want to hear from you. Did the debate shift your opinion of one candidate or another? What did answers to the last question of the night tell you about the candidates, if anything? Join the conversation by calling 866-893-5722.

With files from the Associated Press 

Guests:

Victoria DeFrancesco Soto, director of civic engagement and lecturer in political science at the University of Texas

Lanhee Chen, research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University; he was an adviser for Marco Rubio’s 2016 presidential campaign and served as policy director for the Romney-Ryan 2012 presidential campaign; he tweets @lanheechen

Aaron Kall, director of the Debate Program and Debate Institute at the University of Michigan; he is the editor and co-author of “Debating the Donald” (2016, Amazon Digital Services LLC)