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Mike Bloomberg Has Dropped. What Can He Do With His Never Ending Resources?




A supporter takes a selfie with former Democratic presidential hopeful former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg after he spoke during a rally at Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Super Tuesday, March 3, 2020.
A supporter takes a selfie with former Democratic presidential hopeful former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg after he spoke during a rally at Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Super Tuesday, March 3, 2020.
EVA MARIE UZCATEGUI/AFP via Getty Images

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Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg announced Wednesday he’ll end his bid for president. According to the New York Times, Bloomberg has spent more than half a billion dollars on advertising alone since joining the race a few months ago. 

His decision to exit the race follows a disappointing Super Tuesday finish for the candidate. Bloomberg is now setting his sights on helping former VP Joe Biden, who he has endorsed as the candidate who can take on and beat President Donald Trump. Bloomberg’s ad campaign is likely to help whoever the Democratic nominee is because most of the ads simply attack Trump. Now that the former mayor is no longer a candidate in the race, the rate for advertising goes up.

Today on AirTalk, Larry talks with a campaign finance law expert about how Bloomberg can channel his seemingly never ending resources to continue supporting his cause: remove Trump from office. 

Guest: 

Bradley Smith, expert in election law and campaign finance; professor of law at Capital University in Columbus, Ohio; he’s currently the chairman of the Institute for Free Speech, a nonprofit organization in Washington, D.C. that promotes and defends First Amendment free speech rights; he served on the Federal Election Commission (2000-2005) and was chairman of the Commission in 2004; he tweets @CommishSmith