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Election 2020: What’s Next For Bernie Sanders, Supporters After Two Straight Primary Losses To Joe Biden




Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) delivers a campaign update at the Hotel Vermont on March 11, 2020 in Burlington, Vermont.
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) delivers a campaign update at the Hotel Vermont on March 11, 2020 in Burlington, Vermont.
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

While acknowledging his deficit in the Democratic race, Bernie Sanders said Wednesday he’s pressing ahead with his presidential campaign at least long enough to debate Joe Biden this weekend and try to force him to answer questions about economic inequality and the country’s fraying social safety net.

Sanders addressed reporters after offering no public statements Tuesday night, when he suffered a devastating primary defeat in Michigan and losses in Missouri, Idaho and Mississippi at the hands of Biden. Sanders noted that he won North Dakota and the continuing count in Washington state remained close. But he admitted he was trailing badly, perhaps prohibitively, in the race to secure enough delegates to secure the nomination before the Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee. The Vermont senator offered no further details on what his campaign may look like before or after he and Biden - the last two major candidates left in the Democratic presidential nomination - spar Sunday night on stage in Arizona. And that will continue to raise questions - as unlikely as it may seem less than two weeks after losing his front-runner status - about how long Sanders will persist against increasingly daunting odds.

Today on AirTalk, we’ll explore some possible scenarios for what Bernie Sanders path forward looks like. We also want to hear from you-- call us at 866-893-5722

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News; he tweets @NPRrelving