Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Anxiety, Loneliness, Phone Use: How American Teens Are Experiencing COVID-19




Lizzy Anderson of White Pigeon Michigan packs up and moves out of her dorm at the University of Michigan on March 17, 2020 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Lizzy Anderson of White Pigeon Michigan packs up and moves out of her dorm at the University of Michigan on March 17, 2020 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Listen to story

18:18
Download this story 26MB

With school disrupted for so many American teenagers due to COVID-19, it’s not surprising teens are turning to technology in a time of increased anxiety. 

A new survey by Common Sense Media took a look at teenager’s worries and habits as they shelter in place, and found that 60 percent reported concerns that their families’ health and financial stability will be impacted by the virus. Teens of color especially were more likely to report these worries, with Latino teenagers being the most concerned about financial repercussions. 

While 83 percent of teenagers are texting to stay connected, phone calls are the second most frequently used method of contact. 42 percent of teens said they feel lonelier than normal, with a slightly higher percentage of girls reporting the feeling. 

We dive into these findings with one of the researchers who worked on the survey. Plus, if you are a teenager or the parent of a teenager who’s currently at home, we want to hear from you. Have your feelings of anxiety or loneliness increased? What are you doing to stay connected with friends? Are observing differences in anxiety among your friends of different backgrounds? Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guest:

Jim Steyer, CEO and founder of Common Sense Media in San Francisco, a nonprofit research and advocacy organization that focuses on issues surrounding children, technology and media; their recent survey is “Coronavirus and teenagers