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COVID: Colleges Brace For A Financial Hit If Students Don’t Come Back




A student leaves Lane Tech College Prep High School at the end of the school day on March 16, 2020 in Chicago, Illinois.
A student leaves Lane Tech College Prep High School at the end of the school day on March 16, 2020 in Chicago, Illinois.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

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Colleges and universities have moved to online courses as a response to the coronavirus crisis.

But beyond this semester, some big concerns remain for administrators and students -- when will it be safe to reopen on-campus classes? Will the fall semester be delayed? And if a college or university does reopen, will students show up? For colleges and universities, beyond the safety concerns, a drop in enrollment would pose a big financial hit. And a reduction in international students, who often pay full tuition, can drastically reduce a school's income. If some or all classes have to continue online, some students may not be willing to pay full tuition if they're not getting the full college experience. 

If you're a current or prospective college student who's weighing your options differently now, we want to hear from you. Call 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Lee Gardner, a senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education, covering the management of the university, he's been writing about how college administrators are preparing for the financial disruption of Covid-19; he tweets @_lee_g

Jon Reider, independent college consultant; former director of college counseling at San Francisco University High School, former admissions officer at Stanford University (1985 - 2000)