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Online University Exams Mean Digital Proctoring -- And Some Students Have Privacy Concerns




A student does his schoolwork on his laptop at his home during the second month of quarantine on April 27, 2020 in Caracas, Venezuela.
A student does his schoolwork on his laptop at his home during the second month of quarantine on April 27, 2020 in Caracas, Venezuela.
Leonardo Fernandez Viloria/Getty Images

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With exams coming up and students taking class at online, many universities are turning to digital proctoring to keep them honest come exam season. 

This can range from an actual proctor monitoring students via their cameras, or it can mean software that locks your browser from opening additional tabs or it can mean AI software that scans students’ faces and rooms and watches for signs of cheating. As reported by the New York Times, some students see these technological measures as Orwellian and invasive, and feel cornered by an online learning situation that doesn’t allow for other options. 

We dive into these digital proctoring technologies, as well as the privacy concerns they raise for students. 

Plus, if you’re a university administrator, faculty or student who’s interacted with digital proctoring, what’s your take? Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Shawn Hubler, California correspondent for The New York Times, where her latest story is “Keeping Online Testing Honest? Or an Orwellian Overreach?”; she tweets @ShawnHubler

Julie Uranis, vice president for online and strategic initiatives at University Professional and Continuing Education Association