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What Do You Want To See Come Out Of The Nationwide Anti-Police Brutality Protests?




A protester marches through Hollywood after curfew during a demonstration over the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis Police custody, in Los Angeles, California, June 2, 2020.
A protester marches through Hollywood after curfew during a demonstration over the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis Police custody, in Los Angeles, California, June 2, 2020.
KYLE GRILLOT/AFP via Getty Images

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The anti-police brutality protests sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis continued for a ninth day in Los Angeles Thursday and now head into their second weekend.

One of the protests yesterday started at noon in Grand Park, across the street from L.A. City Hall, and expanded to the streets of downtown. As night approached, the protest continued to grow. This particular protest was promoted by members of LA's Ethiopian community. There were dozens of Ethiopian Americans in the crowd, some waving Ethiopian flags or wearing them. They said they were there to represent African immigrants who, like the rest of the black community, still live under the threat of police violence. National Guard members and LAPD officers could be seen standing in front of nearby buildings. Several National Guard members were also spotted taking photographs of protestors. The protest was peaceful, with no reports of police violence or looting. Around 5 p.m., NBC4 video captured Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore walking outside LAPD headquarters straight to the protesters to take a knee. Moore’s move followed an apology earlier this week for his remarks comparing looting to the killing of George Flyod.

Our question to listeners: Where do we go from here and what concrete things do you want to see come out of the mass protests taking place across the U.S. and beyond? How do you want to see the movement move forward? We want to hear from you. Join the conversation by calling 866-893-5722. 

With files from LAist. Read the full story here

Guests:

Rev. Najuma Smith-Pollard, pastor and program manager of the Cecil Murray Center for Community Engagement at USC; she tweets @RevJuJu

Kathy Wooten, founder of Loving Hands Community Care, Inc., a nonprofit that provides support and aid to families who have lost children to gang violence and trauma in the Los Angeles area

Michel Moore, chief of the Los Angeles Police Department; he tweets @LAPDChiefMoore