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With DACA Decision Looming, Supreme Court Kicks Off Big Week With Major Rulings On LGBTQ Workplace Discrimination, California Sanctuary Law




A man waves a rainbow flag in front of the US Supreme Court that released a decision that says federal law protects LGBTQ workers from discrimination on June 15, 2020 in Washington,DC.
A man waves a rainbow flag in front of the US Supreme Court that released a decision that says federal law protects LGBTQ workers from discrimination on June 15, 2020 in Washington,DC.
JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

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The U.S. Supreme Court was expected to produce plenty of news with the bevy of important decisions on their docket this week, and the justices wasted no time on Monday morning with regards to both important rulings and decisions not to hear certain arguments.

In a big win for the state of California, the Supreme Court on Monday rejected the Trump administration’s bid to throw out the state’s immigrant-sanctuary law that limits local police cooperation with federal immigration authorities. The justices’ order leaves in place lower court rulings that upheld the law. Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas voted to hear the administration's appeal. The administration said the 2017 state immigrant-sanctuary measure conflicts with federal immigration law and makes it harder to deport people who are in the country illegally. California argued that encouraging local police to participate in federal immigration enforcement is counterproductive because it makes people less likely to report crimes if they believe they’ll be deported for doing so.

The High Court also ruled Monday that The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects LGBT people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. The court decided by a 6-3 vote that a key provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 known as Title VII that bars job discrimination because of sex, among other reasons, encompasses bias against LGBT workers. 

At least for now, the Supreme Court is declining to get involved in an ongoing debate by citizens and in Congress over policing, rejecting cases Monday that would have allowed the justices to revisit when police can be held financially responsible for wrongdoing. With protests over racism and police brutality continuing nationwide, the justices turned away more than half a dozen cases involving the legal doctrine known as qualified immunity, which the high court created more than 50 years ago. It shields officials, including police, from lawsuits for money as a result for things they do in the course of their job. 

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Greg Stohr, U.S. Supreme Court reporter for Bloomberg News; he tweets @GregStohr

Lawrence Hurley, reporter covering the Supreme Court for Reuters; he tweets @lawrencehurley

Josie Huang, KPCC reporter who’s been talking with DACA recipients about the impending decision

Kevin de León, sponsor of SB-54, the state’s sanctuary law; former California State Senator; Los Angeles city councilmember-elect for District 14, which includes the neighborhoods of Boyle Heights, Downtown Los Angeles, and parts of Northeast Los Angeles