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Black Americans Experiencing Jump In Rates Of Depression, Anxiety After George Floyd Killing




Thousands fill the streets in support of Black Trans Lives Matter and George Floyd on June 14, 2020 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Thousands fill the streets in support of Black Trans Lives Matter and George Floyd on June 14, 2020 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Michael Noble Jr./Getty Images

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A Census Bureau survey that initially intended to look at the effects of the coronavirus on Americans found that Black and Asian Americans experienced a spike in mental health problems after the killing of George Floyd. 

Meanwhile, rates of depression and anxiety remained the same for White Americans, and decreased for Latinx Americans. 

The number of Black Americans who exhibited clinically significant symptoms of depression or anxiety went up from 36 to 41 percent during the week when the video of Floyd’s death was released. We dive into why this may have happened and the mental health effects of racism on people of color. 

Plus, if you are black and have experienced mental health issues in the wake of George Floyd’s death or the following unrest, call us and share your story via 866-893-5722.

If you or a loved one needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Los Angeles County maintains a 24-hour bilingual hotline at 800-854-7771.

You can find POC specific mental health resources here.

Guests:

Erlanger Turner, licensed psychologist and assistant professor of psychology at Pepperdine University; his recent book is “Mental Health among African Americans: Innovations in Research and Practice” (Lexington Book, 2019)

Denise Williams, licensed marriage and family therapist in Los Angeles