Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

SCOTUS Upholds DACA: We Discuss The Legal, The Political And The Personal Dimensions




Roberto Martinez, a DACA recipient, chants and cheers following the Supreme Court's decision regarding the Trump administration's attempt to end DACA outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Roberto Martinez, a DACA recipient, chants and cheers following the Supreme Court's decision regarding the Trump administration's attempt to end DACA outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Listen to story

36:06
Download this story 52MB

The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, a stunning rebuke to the president in the midst of his reelection campaign.

For now, those immigrants retain their protection from deportation and their authorization to work in the United States.

The 5-4 outcome, in which Chief Justice John Roberts and the four liberal justices were in the majority, seems certain to elevate the issue in Trump’s campaign, given the anti-immigrant rhetoric of his first presidential run in 2016 and immigration restrictions his administration has imposed since then. It was the second big liberal victory at the court this week, following Monday’s ruling that it’s illegal to fire people because they’re gay or transgender.

The justices rejected administration arguments that the 8-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program is illegal and that courts have no role to play in reviewing the decision to end DACA.

We dive into the legal dimensions of the decision, and if you are affected, call us and share how via 866-893-5722. 

With files from the Associated Press.

Guests:

Bill Hing, professor of law and director of The Immigration and Deportation Defense Clinic at University of San Francisco School of Law

Josh Blackman, an associate professor of law at the South Texas College of Law who specializes in constitutional law; he tweets @JoshMBlackman

Josie Huang, KPCC reporter who’s been talking with DACA recipients about the impending decision; she tweets @josie_huang

Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News; he tweets @NPRrelving