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How Should Decisions Be Made Over Problematic Statues And Monuments?




People gather around the Robert E. Lee statue on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia, on June 4, 2020, amid continued protests over the death of George Floyd in police custody.
People gather around the Robert E. Lee statue on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia, on June 4, 2020, amid continued protests over the death of George Floyd in police custody.
RYAN M. KELLY/AFP via Getty Images

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Protesters tore down more statues across the United States, expanding the razing in a San Francisco park to the writer of America’s national anthem and the general who won the country’s Civil War that ended widespread slavery.

In Seattle, pre-dawn violence erupted Saturday in a protest zone largely abandoned by police, where one person was fatally shot and another critically injured. On the East Coast, more statues honoring Confederates who tried to break away from the United States more than 150 years ago were toppled.

But several were removed at the order of North Carolina’s Democratic governor, who said he was trying to avoid violent clashes or injuries from toppling the heavy monuments erected by white supremacists that he said do not belong in places like the state Capitol grounds that are for all people. The statues are falling amid continuing anti-racism demonstrations following the May 25 police killing in Minneapolis of George Floyd, the African American man who died after a white police officer pressed his knee on his neck and whose death galvanized protesters around the globe to rally against police brutality and racism.

Today on AirTalk, we discuss the latest with statues, monuments and symbols. We also want to hear from you. What are your thoughts? What process do you think should be followed when it comes to making decisions about the future of these statues? Should there be a vote? Tell us your thoughts by calling 866-893-5722. 

With files from the Associated Press 

Guest: 

Carolina Miranda, staff writer at LA Times who was in downtown L.A. reporting on this over the weekend, she tweets @cmonstah