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SCOTUS Decisions: Louisiana Abortion And Consumer Financial Protection Bureau




Anti-abortion activists demonstrate in front of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on June 29, 2020.
Anti-abortion activists demonstrate in front of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on June 29, 2020.
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images

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A divided Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law regulating abortion clinics, reasserting a commitment to abortion rights over fierce opposition from dissenting conservative justices in the first big abortion case of the Trump era.

Chief Justice John Roberts and his four more liberal colleagues ruled that the law requiring doctors who perform abortions have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals violates the abortion rights the court first announced in the landmark Roe v. Wade decision in 1973.

The Louisiana law is virtually identical to one in Texas that the court struck down in 2016.

The Supreme Court also made it easier for the president to fire the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Monday.

The justices struck down restrictions on when the president can remove the bureau’s director.

The court’s five conservative justices agreed that restrictions Congress imposed on when the president can fire the agency's director violated the Constitution. But they disagreed on what to do as a result. Roberts and fellow conservative justices Samuel Alito and Brett Kavanaugh said the restrictions could be stricken from the law. The court’s four liberals agreed, though they disagreed the restrictions were improper.

The decision doesn’t have a big impact on the current head of the agency. Kathy Kraninger, who was nominated to her current post by the president in 2018, had said she believed the president could fire her at any time.

With files from the Associated Press

Guest:

Greg Stohr, Supreme Court reporter for Bloomberg News; he tweets @GregStohr