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Are You Using Telehealth Care Because Of The Pandemic? Tell Us How It’s Going




Malian migrant worker Tidjane (L) wearing a protective face mask attends a teleconsultation on suspicion of COVID-19, at a special medical unit set up outside a building housing migrant workers as part of a private initiative supported by the Paris city hall.
Malian migrant worker Tidjane (L) wearing a protective face mask attends a teleconsultation on suspicion of COVID-19, at a special medical unit set up outside a building housing migrant workers as part of a private initiative supported by the Paris city hall.
CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP via Getty Images

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Got a smartphone, tablet or computer? That’s all you really need to use telemedicine, sometimes called telehealth or virtual visits.

Generally, it just refers to a video visit with a remotely located care provider like a doctor or therapist over a secure connection. Physicians, therapists and public officials have encouraged the use of virtual care as a way to limit the spread of COVID-19. And some believe the pandemic has transformed the industry and that the impression is likely to stick. 

Virtual care has long been touted as a way to get help quickly instead of waiting days to see a doctor, yet Americans have been slow to embrace it. There are signs that may be changing because of COVID-19. Telemedicine often involves diagnosing and treating a new health problem but is also used to keep tabs on existing, long-term conditions like diabetes. It’s more than calling to get a prescription refill, although doctors can write some prescriptions, like antibiotics, after a telemedicine visit. Today on AirTalk, we want to hear from listeners. Do you have thoughts on how the telehealth industry is evolving? Are you a physician, therapist or counselor who has implemented telehealth? Are you a patient who is using the method of care for the first time? What do you think? Join the conversation by calling 866-893-5722. 

With files from the Associated Press