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Imagining Future LA: How This Pandemic Could Change The Design Of Offices, Homes And Cities




Commuters walk through the newly opened Fulton Center train station in lower Manhattan on November 10, 2014 in New York City.
Commuters walk through the newly opened Fulton Center train station in lower Manhattan on November 10, 2014 in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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After the black death swept Medieval Europe, cities cleaned up their streets and expanded boulevards. Disease has often forced humans to rethink the way they use and design space -- and COVID-19 will likely prompt change and innovation as well.

As families spend more time in their homes, working and doing online classes, how will domestic architecture shift to accommodate? How will office floorplans change based on the hygienic needs of social distancing and ventilation? What about bars, restaurants or concert venues? 

We sit down with two architects to imagine how the pandemic might influence the way Los Angeles looks in the future.

Guests:

Dana Cuff, professor of architecture and urban design and founding director of cityLAB, a research center that develops urban innovations at the University of California, Los Angeles

John Dutton, architect, urban designer and principal of Los Angeles based Dutton Architects; he is a adjunct associate professor of architecture at USC