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Where Does President Donald Trump Stand With Voters Of Color?




Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron stands on stage in an empty Mellon Auditorium while addressing the Republican National Convention on August 25, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron stands on stage in an empty Mellon Auditorium while addressing the Republican National Convention on August 25, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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President Donald Trump continued attempting to appeal to Black voters at the Republican National Convention last night, as various voices took the stage in support of his reelection. 

Two stand out speakers from earlier this week were people of color: former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley and South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, the only Black Republican in the Senate.

One of several African Americans on the schedule, former football star Herschel Walker, defended the president against those who call him a racist.

“It hurts my soul to hear the terrible names that people call Donald,” Walker said in prepared remarks. “The worst one is ‘racist.’ I take it as a personal insult that people would think I would have a 37-year friendship with a racist.”

However, the program also featured Mark and Patricia McCloskey, the St. Louis couple arrested after pointing guns at Black Lives Matter protesters marching past their home. While Black voters generally favor Joe Biden over Trump, Latino voters have been more loyal to the Republican party. Today on AirTalk, Larry talks with political experts about where the president and Republican party stand with voters of color and how strategies are playing out at the GOP convention. Are you a Republican or a Trump supporter? What are your thoughts? Give us a call at 866-893-5722.   

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Maya King, politics reporter covering race and demographics for  POLITICO; she tweets @mayaaking

Sonja Diaz, the founding executive director of the Latino Policy and Politics Initiative at UCLA, a non partisan think tank; she’s also a practicing civil rights attorney and policy adviser; she tweets @SonjaFrancine

Pete Peterson, dean of the School of Public Policy and senior fellow at The Davenport Institute at Pepperdine University; he tweets @Pete4CA