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What To Watch For In Tonight’s Trump v Biden Debate




This combination of file pictures shows Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaking in Tampa, Florida and US President Donald Trump speaking during an event for black supporters at the Cobb Galleria Centre.
This combination of file pictures shows Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaking in Tampa, Florida and US President Donald Trump speaking during an event for black supporters at the Cobb Galleria Centre.
JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

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In an election year like no other, the first debate between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, could be a pivotal moment in a race that has remained stubbornly unchanged in the face of historic tumult.

The Tuesday night debate will offer a massive platform for Trump and Biden to outline their starkly different visions for a country facing multiple crises, including racial justice protests and a pandemic that has killed more than 200,000 Americans and cost millions of jobs. The health emergency has upended the usual trappings of a presidential campaign, lending heightened importance to the debate. But amid intense political polarization, comparatively few undecided voters remain, raising questions as to how, or if, the debate might shape a race that has been defined by its bitterness and, at least so far, its stability.

Biden will step onto the Cleveland stage holding leads in the polls - significant in the national surveys, closer in the battleground states - but facing questions about his turn in the spotlight, particularly considering Trump’s withering attacks. And Trump, with only 35 days to change the course of the race, will have arguably his best chance to try to reframe the campaign as a choice election and not a referendum over his handling of a virus that has killed more people in America than any other nation. But the impact of the debate - or the two that follow in the weeks ahead - remains unclear. Despite the upheaval, the presidential race has remained largely unchanged since Biden seized control of the Democratic field in March. The nation has soured on Trump's handling of the pandemic, and while his base of support has remained largely unchanged, he has seen defections among older and female voters, particularly in the suburbs, and his path to 270 Electoral College votes, while still viable, has shrunk.

Today on AirTalk, we break down the upcoming presidential debate.

Guests:

Tyler Pager, national political reporter for Bloomberg News; he tweets @tylerpager

Aaron Kall, director of debate at the University of Michigan and author of the book “Debating The Donald