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Debating Prop 20: Making It Easier To Charge Certain Crimes As Felonies, Plus Some Parole Restrictions




An inmate at Chino State Prison speaks to a parole officer in the overcrowded dayroom of Sycamore Hall that was modified to house prisoners on December 10, 2010 in Chino, California.
An inmate at Chino State Prison speaks to a parole officer in the overcrowded dayroom of Sycamore Hall that was modified to house prisoners on December 10, 2010 in Chino, California.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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Prop 20 would make it easier to charge certain crimes as felonies, and prohibit early parole for more crimes.

It's an effort to roll back portions of previous measures designed to reduce California's state prison population. One of them, 2014's Proposition 47 (authored by current L.A. district attorney candidate George Gascón), allows certain non-violent, minor crimes to be charged as misdemeanors when they previously were classified as felonies, or could have been classified as either a misdemeanor or felony -- crimes known as "wobblers." They include shoplifting, property theft, check forgery and certain cases of drug possession. (Here's more on Proposition 47.)

Another measure, 2016's Prop 57, made it easier for certain felons to get released early on parole. Nonviolent inmates could get released after serving the sentence for their primary offense, and other inmates could earn credits to reduce their sentences through good behavior or participation in certain prison programs. Prop 20 would reverse some of these provisions. 

To read more, go to our Voter Game Plan

We  look at the pros and cons. 

With files from LAist. 

Guests: 

Robert Harris, a director of the Los Angeles Police Protective League, the union representing Los Angeles Police Department officers, and an LAPD officer

Sophora Acheson, executive director of Ruby’s Place, a nonprofit that provides services and operates a trauma recovery center for victims of domestic violence, human trafficking and other violent crimes