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The History And Logistics Of Platonic Partnerships: When Friends Become The Number One In Each Other's Lives




Four people take cell phone images of one person near the Venice Beach Pier on December 13, 2019 at Venice Beach, California.
Four people take cell phone images of one person near the Venice Beach Pier on December 13, 2019 at Venice Beach, California.
Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

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For many people today, their spouse or romantic partner is the central relationship of their life, but why is that the case? And what is it like for people to center friendships in their lives instead? 

In the Atlantic’s “What If Friendship, Not Marriage, Was at the Center of Life?”, Rhaina Cohen explores these questions through various couples, some of whom live together, raise children together and have legal arrangements to tie their bond. She also dives into the history of “romantic friendships,” which were fairly common in the 18th and 19th centuries, and which started to change in the 20th century. 

What led to those changes? We sit down with Cohen to dive into the piece. 

Plus, if you are in a romantic friendship, we want to hear about your relationship and what it means to you. Call us at 866-893-5722. 

Guest: 

Rhaina Cohen, producer and editor of narrative podcasts at NPR; her recent piece for the Atlantic is “What If Friendship, Not Marriage, Was at the Center of Life?”; she tweets @rhainacohen