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As Trump Campaign Challenges Vote Counts, Processes In Several States, A Look At The Laws And Mechanics Governing Recounts




President Trump speaks about his plan to address the opioid crisis at an event at Manchester Community College in Manchester, N.H., on Monday.
President Trump speaks about his plan to address the opioid crisis at an event at Manchester Community College in Manchester, N.H., on Monday.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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President Donald Trump's campaign filed lawsuits Wednesday in Pennsylvania and Michigan, laying the groundwork for contesting the outcome in undecided battlegrounds that could determine whether he gets another four years in the White House.

The new filings, joining existing Republican legal challenges in Pennsylvania and Nevada, demand better access for campaign observers to locations where ballots are being processed and counted, the campaign said. However, at one Michigan location in question The Associated Press observed poll watchers from both sides monitoring on Wednesday. Nevada is undecided as well. The Trump campaign also is seeking to intervene in a Pennsylvania case at the Supreme Court that deals with whether ballots received up to three days after the election can be counted, deputy campaign manager Justin Clark said. His campaign also announced that it would ask for a recount in Wisconsin, a state The Associated Press called for Democrat Joe Biden on Wednesday afternoon. Campaign manager Bill Stepien cited “irregularities in several Wisconsin counties,” without providing specifics.

The Trump campaign said it is calling for a temporary halt in the counting in Michigan and Pennsylvania until it is given “meaningful” access in numerous locations and allowed to review ballots that already have been opened and processed. Trump is running slightly behind Biden in Michigan. The president is ahead in Pennsylvania but his margin is shrinking as more mailed ballots are counted.

There have been no reports of fraud or any type of ballot concerns out of Pennsylvania. The state had 3.1 million mail-in ballots that take time to count and an order allows them to be received and counted up until Friday if they are postmarked by Nov. 3.

Today on AirTalk, we’ll look at the rules and mechanics governing recounts in a presidential race and preview what to expect.

With files from The Associated Press

Guests:

Anita Kumar, White House correspondent and associate editor for POLITICO; she tweets @anitakumar01

Michael Kang, professor of law at Northwestern University; his expertise includes election law and voting rights

Libby Denkmann, KPCC politics reporter; she tweets @libdenk