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What Does A Biden Administration Mean For Businesses?




U.S. President-elect Joe Biden addresses the media about the Trump Administration’s lawsuit to overturn the Affordable Care Act on November 10, 2020 at the Queen Theater in Wilmington, Delaware.
U.S. President-elect Joe Biden addresses the media about the Trump Administration’s lawsuit to overturn the Affordable Care Act on November 10, 2020 at the Queen Theater in Wilmington, Delaware.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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The Trump administration has long portrayed itself as pro-business and anti-regulation, but it also has a reputation for instability. With a Biden administration, many experts argue, comes predictability.

Although President-elect Joe Biden ran on a platform of higher corporate tax rates and expanded healthcare, Biden could be better for business than the alternative, according to a recent Wall Street Journal piece from Greg Ip. Biden moving into the role of the president could ultimately mean little change with a split congress. Business leaders say one of the most important issues at hand for businesses is the global coronavirus pandemic, and it’s unclear what’s to come between hypothetical stimulus efforts and potential lockdowns and mandates. It’s a severe balancing act, and no matter what happens, it’ll have huge implications. 

Today on AirTalk, Larry talks with business leaders about what a new administration in the White House could mean for businesses in California and beyond. Do you have thoughts or questions? Join the conversation by calling 866-893-5722.  

Guests: 

Kevin Klowden, executive director of the Milken Institute’s Center for Regional Economics and California Center; he tweets @KevinKlowden

Stuart Waldman, president of the Valley Industry and Commerce Association (VICA); he tweets @stuartwaldman

Christine Meisner Rosen, associate professor of Business and Public Policy at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business; associate director of the Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry