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SoCal’s Varying Dining Public Health Rules, And What They Mean For Restaurants




A waiter at Raku, an Asian restaurant in Bethesda, wears a protective face mask as serve customers outdoors amid the coronavirus pandemic on June 12, 2020 in Bethesda, Maryland.
A waiter at Raku, an Asian restaurant in Bethesda, wears a protective face mask as serve customers outdoors amid the coronavirus pandemic on June 12, 2020 in Bethesda, Maryland.
Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

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As of 10 p.m. on Wednesday, November 25, restaurants and bars in Los Angeles County will have to stop all dine-in service (most of which is outdoors these days) for at least three weeks. During that period, they'll only be able to offer takeout, drive-through and delivery.

These are the most stringent restrictions imposed on local dining and drinking establishments since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Many have been hanging on by a thread and for some, the new public health order will likely be a death blow. Read more on LAist.

The city of Pasadena will continue to allow outdoor dining, while Long Beach is falling more in line with LA County’s approach. We check in on the different approaches, plus we want to hear from you. If you own a restaurant or brewery, or work in the industry, how are you dealing? Call us at 866-893-5722. 


With files from LAist.

Guests: 

Kelly Colopy, director of the Health and Human Services Department for the city of Long Beach 

Jot Condie, president & CEO of the California Restaurant Association, an advocacy organization for the restaurant industry

Shruti Gohil, M.D., professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine’s School of Medicine